Maximizing Team Performance

Henry Ford once said, “Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.” The goal of group or team facilitation is to get to the point where your team is working together towards a common purpose.  Momentum comes with everyone being engaged /  aligned to the purpose having clarity around roles and responsibilities (the “What” we do as a team).  Equally important but often somewhat ignored is the (the “How”” we work together as a team)  How do we collaborate well together, deal with conflict, minimise politics, decision make, deal with personality clashes – we are human so we are going to be different.  Having discussed and set norms or guidelines for these critical aspects of teaming can make all the difference.  It does take time and effort but effective team facilitation can speed up the process (even have fun doing it) and make all the difference between leading a good team and leading a great team.  Why settle for less.

Teams are not going away.  The Deloitte Human Capital Trends report surveyed over 7,000 companies across 130 countries, and the conclusion after almost one year of study was that digital advancements has shaken the foundation of how we work.

 

The new world of work is shifting away from traditional hierarchical structures and moving towards what Deloitte has called a “network of teams”.  This is where we can help you build and get the maximum potential from your senior leadership team.  Getting it right at the senior level team has never been more critical as the momentum / energy cascades from the top down to the teams beneath.

The steps to effective team facilitation

At BBA Training, our ultimate goal is to maximise both performance and engagement through facilitating senior team leaders in creating an environment that encourages better teamwork and resilience over time. Key to this is having a robust teaming process that everybody understands and clearly sees the benefits of engaging in the workshop.

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Getting clarity from the leader on the overarching team purpose and exploring the challenges to be overcome.  Having clarity on what the desired outcome is critical for success.  Asking questions like: What do you want to accomplish in this workshop?  What does a good outcome look like?  What do you want the team doing, thinking or feeling after the workshop?  What challenges are you facing? What have you tried in the past? What does success look like to you?  It is best proactive to engage with all  – or at least key – participants, depending on the size of the group, asking similar questions: What challenges are you facing in meeting objectives you’re accountable for? What is your take on a particular issue? Where do you want to be at the end of this session?  We will get participants to complete the forte communication profile in advance of these discussions so as to build in a forte readback to give the participants insights on their communication and teaming preferences.

 

We design and develop a bespoke workshop to reach these goals. We work hard to create a brilliant learning experience that participants love to attend.  An experienced facilitator knows the importance of a thoughtful, well-planned agenda. It has to be pragmatic, flexible, experiential and have a robust process.To achieve this we use graphic visualisation tools such as storyboards, cover stories, five bold steps and much more.  One of our most effective and insights tools is the Drexler/Sibbet Team Performance® Model from the Grove Consultants International. Designed by Allan Drexler and David Sibbet, this model illustrates team development as seven stages, four to create the team and three to describe increasing levels of sustained performance. This tool generates great discussion and is one of the key elements that differentiate our sessions from that of team building.

 

We also use the forte team pulse report. The unique and innovative Forté Team Pulse Report is designed to help individuals best understand how they fit, are adapting and how to achieve success with their teammates. Quickly, the team leader and team members see exactly which strengths and behaviours get the job done most efficiently. Misunderstanding is significantly reduced, and appreciation for how team members can best adapt and balance with one another is clear. Each individual on your team may participate in a different way. There are those who want to get their thoughts in order before they share; others feed off dialogue and the exchange of ideas; still, others just start talking from the off. All three ways are valid ways of contributing; what your facilitator needs to do is ensure that each is able to voice his/her opinion and contribute to the process.

2. Engaging & interactive workshop

Participants are coming to facilitated sessions with individual positions, preferences and perceived risks.  Starting out the session by driving straight towards your ultimate goal – “We’re here today to understand why operations and engineering are not working together effectively” – forces people to defend their positions. It creates an Us vs. Them mentality that hinders group work and collaboration before it can even begin.

 

Instead, an effective facilitation should begin with exercises and messaging that elicits honesty from participants without the need to defend their positions. It is therefore useful for the first 20% of the session to be focused on building agreement and shared understanding among the parties through a series of thoughtful, powerful, and more open-ended questions.

3. Forte team pulse report

The unique and innovative Forté Team Pulse Report is designed to help individuals best understand how they fit, are adapting and how to achieve success with their teammates. Quickly, the team leader and team members see exactly which strengths and behaviours get the job done most efficiently. Misunderstanding is significantly reduced, and appreciation for how team members can best adapt and balance with one another is clear.   Each individual on your team may participate in a different way. There are those who want to get their thoughts in order before they share; others feed off dialogue and the exchange of ideas; still others just start talking and let their brains catch up to their mouths after. All three ways are valid ways of contributing; what your facilitator needs to do is ensure that each is able to voice his/her opinion and contribute to the process.

 

Find out more about Forté team pulse reports.

4. Moving to the next level

Participants are coming to facilitated sessions with individual positions, preferences and perceived risks.  Starting out the session by driving straight towards your ultimate goal – “We’re here today to understand why operations and engineering are not working together effectively” – forces people to defend their positions. It creates an Us vs. Them mentality that hinders group work and collaboration before it can even begin.

 

Instead, an effective facilitation should begin with exercises and messaging that elicits honesty from participants without the need to defend their positions. It is therefore useful for the first 20% of the session to be focused on building agreement and shared understanding among the parties through a series of thoughtful, powerful, and more open-ended questions.

If you would like to discuss your team’s performance, create a three-year plan for you, your team and your department and to uncover any blocks that preventing success, contact us via phone or email below…